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Fix It Friday - How to Fix Tears with Visible Mending

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Today we are weaving! Weaving? I always thought weaving had to be done on a loom, but no, weaving can be done anywhere. And, why is this related to repairing clothes? Well, when we mend a tear in a garment, the objective is not only to close the gap, but to reinforce and protect the fabric from further wear and tear.  Weaving does an excellent job, and it looks great on jeans too!  Because it is visible to others, it is called visible mending. In this tutorial I am demonstrating on a piece of scrap jean material. 

This tutorial is part of the Fix It Friday series.

Fix it Friday photo FixitFridayLogo_zpsd7ad88ec.png





Step 1 Seal the gap

Iron on interfacing to the wrong side of the garment. Remember to (a) cut off stray ends, and (b) cut the size of the interfacing to slightly larger than the tear.




Step 2 Define your weaving area

Use tailor chalk and draw a box around the tear. Thread a needle with double stranded embroidery thread, and sew warp threads across the box you have drawn. You can use choose a colour that matches your garment, or a colour that stands out.

I made a video of Step 2 and Step 3 (hope you like it!)


Step 3 Start weaving

Weave over and under the warp threads remembering to secure each woven strand at the end by pushing needle through the fabric. The weaves should be as close as possible. 

End off with a knot at the wrong side of the fabric once all the weaving is done. This process is long, but rewarding. Just remember to be patient and don't be greedy when using the embroidery thread - it's horrible when you end up in knots!







Until next week!





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Abdelghafour

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2 comments

  1. So glad to watch a video on darning. I always struggle trying to get it to look right, so now that I have your tutorial I'll have a better idea on how to make this work. Can't wait to get started on some repairs!

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    1. Thanks, Brooke. Once you get started you get addicted!

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