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Slow Fashion - Sashiko

11 comments
Slow Fashion - Sashiko
sashiko

A friend of mine once asked if so many people have an aversion to fast food, why can't this be the same of fast fashion? If there is a growing slow fashion movement, then shouldn't there be one for fashion as well?  I'm not really sure, why is there this discrimination? What makes people behave differently towards fast fashion? It might be because we are really spoilt for choice when it comes to clothing versus our fast food options - different styles come into the store every day, we are bombarded with marketing campaigns telling us to buy new or we will lose out if we don't, (that's kiasuism to the Singaporean), and we all want to look and feel good (unfortunately, that's human nature). 
Slow fashion is all about developing a deeper meaningful relationship with your clothes. Jane Milburn of Textile Beat says:

"It is about thoughtful, ethical, creative and sustainable ways to enjoy the garments we wear every day while minimising our material footprint on the world. "

When I spoke to an assembly of students at Compassvale Secondary School, I told them that slow fashion is all about being best friends with your clothes  - taking good care of them, treating them well and never tossing them to one side. If you do that, then your clothes will last a great deal longer!

I hope they got the picture; it's all about tender loving care, good old TLC.
Like this pair of denim shorts that I repaired and repaired again.
"Denim has a life and lives with the wearer" (Clothing Poverty, Andrew Brooks), and mine do too!
sashiko jeans
I had originally patched and darned the weak points of my shorts, and even added a touch of sashiko, but over a period of a few months, the fabric was starting to thin out. I have now given it a bit of character - they are truly MINE! 
Sashiko Eases the Stresses of Daily Life
Just taking the needle and sashiko thread and sewing running stitches across my shorts has been very therapeutic. It has made me think about life (I'll tell you later!). 
You might be wondering how I could just sit there and sew running stitches. Well, let me tell you a little secret - sashiko is really not done the same way as a normal running stitch. I only found out when I was struggling during my first foray into the Japanese repair technique. 
Sashiko is About Pushing Fabric Not the Needle
how to sashiko

Yes, that's right. It is all about pushing the fabric with your non-needle holding hand (for me my left hand) onto the needle. 
how to sashiko

The needle is held in position by your other hand and propped up against a sashiko thimble that rests on the middle of your palm. Here's an amazing video that I found on youtube from Bebe Bold. Can you see how easy it is? This has made it so much easier (and faster) than relying on sewing with the needle itself.


I didn't have a pattern, I just went wild and let my hands do the thinking. 
I now have a reinforced bum on my pair of shorts!

how to sashiko

how to sashiko

This sashiko project took me a few evenings to complete, but I think it can be done in one day without any interruptions. For those of you who love anything creative, once you start, you can't stop, and that's what is so lovely about slow fashion - it slows you down, and once you are in the flow it can be the most therapeutic thing to have. Try it and let me know how you feel!
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Abdelghafour

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11 comments

  1. Love it Agy!! Your jeans look fabulous! I think with fast food - it's your own body you're putting the food into and seeing an effect on yourself, whereas fast fashion is less of a personal problem. I think it's harder for people to make changes for things that they can't see directly affecting them now. :(

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  2. You make lots of great points about slow fashion...like treating clothes as your friends. Great needlework too.

    The Pink Paperdoll

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  3. They look great and it's awesome that ethical fashion is becoming more popular.

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  4. You are so right...so many of us get wrapped up in fast fashion which equals lots of wasted money, wasted closet space, and wasted environmental elements. Great post! - Amy @ http://thegiftedgabber.com/

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  5. That's such an interesting and unique idea. The needlework is wonderful too.

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  6. Hi! Would you mind showing how you did the thick pink/green patches? I love how it looks!

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  7. I love what you did to your jeans. You always the best sewing technique. I enjoy seeing how you refashion your clothes!!

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  8. I still haven't had time to give this a shot. my 7 year old has all hand me downs with holes that I want to make cute!

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  9. Wow, this is a great idea to mend your favorite jeans. This turned out beautiful!

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  10. wow this is amazing i really need to try for one of ootd posts!!

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  11. Hi Agy- Love this! Do you teach sashiko? If not, do you know where to get sashiko supplies in Singapore?
    Thanks!

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